Emma Nutrition

Simplifying the science through cooking and education. When I'm not on Mummy duties…


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Fat blaster drink [recipe by a Nutritionist]

Fat blaster drink Emma nutritionWhether you’re aim is to burn fat to look better or if it’s to make yourself feel a whole lot better this fat blaster is a thirst quencher hottie and will soon become a firm (get it, firm? hahaha hilarious) favourite! Sip it throughout the day and save a glass of it as an afternoon pick me up.

I’m reposting this as part of Emily’s link up at A Mummy Too #recipeoftheweek

Without further ado here is the

Fat Blaster Drink

Ingredients:

Cinnamon x 1tsp
Cayenne (or paprika) x 1tsp
Water or cold green tea x 500ml
Orange x 1 juiced or squeezed. I put a whole orange in the juicer as that way you also get the antioxidant flavanoids from the pith and the skin.
Ice cubes x 5

Method:
Put all ingredients in a jar and shake. Leave in the fridge until you want to drink and up to 3 days or so. I like to drink this throughout the day.

Nutritional info:

Cayenne is a thermogenic that burns fat by activating lipid cells – one study has shown that inclusion of these compounds in the diet may aid weight management while cinnamon stabilises blood sugar levels keeping them balanced and reducing cravings. Additionally it’s obviously great to drink as much water as possible to keep hydrated, flush out toxins and assist metabolic processes in the body and if you use green tea you will reap extra thermogenic benefits.

 


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Oaty Choco Cookies

This delectable recipe is courtesy of my friend Nicole. You can check out her music over here. I could eat these every day!

Ingredients:

Oaty Choco Cookies

Oats x 1 cup
Almonds/nuts x 1/3 cup
Sultanas/dried fruit x 1/3 cup
Mixed seeds x 1/3 cup

Roast in the oven (toss intermittently) until oats are golden brown.

Then Heat up:

Ghee x 1 tbsp
Coconut oil x 1 tbsp
Maple syrup x 1 tbsp
Vanilla essence x 1 tbsp

Add 1 cup plain flour, 1 egg, 1 cup chopped dates and the heated mixture in with the cup of muesli, mix with a spoon, place on baking paper on tray in flat cookie shapes, place in oven on 180′ for 15/20 mins, stand to cool.

Topping:

Avocado x 2
Cocoa/cacao x 2 tbsp
Honey/ maple syrup x 1 tbsp (more to taste)

Blend and cool in fridge until cookies are cool. Once cooled spread avocado mixture on cookies and top with strawberries

Nutritional info:
While these biscuits are high in calories they are a healthy treat. Good for adults and children alike. Replacing hydrogenated fats with healthier unprocessed fats such as ghee and coconut oil enables the product to bind. Fats are important for nerve and brain function as well as skin health. Using oats as a base you are able to use less flour – if you use rice of gluten free flour these are wheat free.


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10 Steps to beat your sugar addiction

10 steps to beat your sugar addiction:

1. Clean out your kitchen beat sugar addiction
Check your labels and throw out anything that has sugar as the first ingredient. Ingredients are listed in order of volume so if sugar is first then the product is predominantly sugar. Packaged products should have less than 5 ingredients in them.

2. Learn what sugar is also known as
Rice syrup, glucose, fructose, high fructose corn syrup. The list is long and you should get to know what sugar is hidden as.

3. Ditch artificial sweeteners
While artificial sweeteners don’t contain sugar they do have an impact on blood sugar levels. They may not contain calories but the body is tricked into thinking it has had sugar and it releases insulin which makes you feel you need more sugar.

4. Eat clean foods
The cleaner your diet the better you will feel. Remove hydrogenated oils like corn and soybean, anything pre-cooked or altered from its natural state such as margarine. If you feel good you won’t need sugar as an artificial energy boost.

5. Get some supplements
Supplements such as Chromium have been shown to decrease cravings for sugar. Just 50mcg per day can reduce that afternoon sugar craving that many of us have.

6. Meditate
Meditating to break the cycle of mindless eating is a powerful tool that many people are now using. When you sit down for a meal take a moment to have a deep breath, smell your food and appreciate what it is that you are eating.

7. Find pleasure
Taking pleasure from other things in life can decrease your need or desire for ‘sweetness’ from sugar. Get your sweet treat from a massage, a walk in a field or some beautiful music.

8. Do squats
Squats and press ups have been shown to decrease post eating blood glucose levels by 62%! Doing just 5 mins of squats after you eat can reduce the impact that sugar can have on you. Additionally and most importantly if your blood sugar levels are stable you are less likely to crave sugar.

9. Drink Lemon juice
Consuming 4 tablespoons of lemon juice prior to a meal can again reduce the blood sugar impact. Even if it’s not sugar but a carbohydrate meal your body will thank you for this simple and easy tool that will stabilise your blood sugar levels.

10. Find sweet replacements
If you do like to have something sweet its best to factor it in and count your sugar levels that day, mindfully allowing for the sugar. Or better still use products such as 80% dark chocolate that contain less sugar or use Stevia, a healthy sugar replacement.

Following these 10 steps will help you to reduce your sugar addiction as well as boosting energy. You will feel better both physically and emotionally when you eat clean and mindfully. As a bonus the sum of small changes such as squats and a better diet will boost your metabolism and as a bonus it will boost fat loss; to burn fat you must first burn sugar. Limit sugar and your body has the opportunity to burn fat.

If you would like to take it one step further you can try my free detox program here.


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DIY Sports Isotonic Drink

Isotonic drinks are super easy to make so it does make me wonder why we aren’t all doing it! Marketing has a lot to answer for… The competition for sports drinks market share is huge with phenomenal spend per year going on research and development and communicating the ‘rehydration’ message to consumers.  The sports drink industry in the UK is currently at £260m a year while in the US it is projected to reach $2bn by 2016. This rise in sports drink consumption is led by the belief that we cannot hydrate with water alone and that fluid intake is as critical to athletic performance as proper training is.

The ‘water isn’t good enough’ belief system is fed to consumers and developed through interwoven relationships with research institutes and professional athletes – all funded by multinationals. Oh the complex web! In 2001 PepsiCo bought Gatorade. Coca-Cola owns Powerade while the pharma giant GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) owns Lucozade. Powerade was a partner company to the London 2012 Olympics and Powerade a service provider to the London 2012 Olympics. On a more local scale sports drinks and supplement companies aim to work with gyms and gym instructors. Virgin Active has a partnership with Powerade, for example, and the GSK owned supplement brand, Maxinutrition (previously Maximuscle), has a partnership with LA Fitness. It has become common for athletes to test and monitor hydration levels and to reason that performance was altered or hindered by dehydration – lack of hydration. Therefore the athlete needs to hydrate as quickly and efficiently as possible with the best possible combination of fluids and nutrients. The link between what they drank and what performance levels were has become a measure of success. Drinking ahead of thirst and training your gut to tolerate more fluid are added marketing bonuses…. Or are they? Where does the truth lay? Is the science being overcomplicated in an effort to increase sales? Or just over-marketed?

I will admit to being a staunch believer in pre-hydration and sports drinks for athletes or those exercising for more than an hour; I also don’t see the problem with using clinical trials and scientific evidence to disseminate information in an effort to increase sales. I aim for 3L (I usually reach 2L) per day of water to maintain optimum health so it stands to reason that athletes need even more fluid due to sweating. I will also admit however to basing my beliefs on the science of those of my generation. My bible of sports nutrition Practical Sports Nutrition written by Louise Burke PhD who works for the Australian Institute of Sport often sits on my desk as a reference tool. Many studies I read have the name Ron Maughan in them (an eminent researcher in sports nutrition and professor at Loughborough University). However my own knowledge and those of my peers may even be swayed by the multinationals – Louise Burke and Ron Maughan both have financial links (personal or institutional) to Gatorade and their book Food, Nutrition and Sports Performance II: The International Olympic Committee Consensus on Sports Nutrition, published in 2004 was supported by Coca-Cola, the makers of Powerade. While this may sound biased it isn’t necessarily so – research needs funding from somewhere and a respected professional wont want to lose any of their professional integrity by publishing research that is against their ethos even if it fits a multinationals marketing requirements.

It is however a fine line. Just as a GP can be swayed to prescribe a certain drug because the pharma manufacturer took them on a nice break to the Caribbean (for a conference of course) or gave them a free lunch a sports nutritionist or gym instructor too can be swayed by power and money.

Recently I came across Dr Tim Noakes who is viewed as a maverick in the medical world. He has a book called Waterlogged that takes you inside the science of athlete hydration for a fascinating look at the human body’s need for water and how it uses the liquids it ingests. This, like most of the conclusions I come to regarding health, brings us back to the principle that every body is different. Just as we metabolise and utilise vitamins and minerals differently so we do water. Listen to your body, find out what works for you. Which practices make you feel great and which ones do you need to change?

In the meantime here is a DIY recipe for a sports isotonic drink. This is a drink I rarely use myself as I’m not an endurance athlete but it has been trialled and is often used by athletes I work with.

DIY Sports Drink 

Ingredients: DIY Isotonic Drink

700ml water

30gm fructose aka fruit sugar

20gm sucrose aka sugar

1/4 tspn sea or mineral salt

10ml lemon juice bottled or fresh

Method: Combine and mix well. That’s it!

This costs approximately 10p or 20c to make – a few pence more if you splash the cash and use a real lemon ;)

 

Emma


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7 surprising benefits of Spirulina

7 surprising benefits of Spirulina by Emma Nutrition

Spirulina is a blue-green algae found in the sea. Its closest food relative is oysters. While I love the benefits of oysters the texture is only something I can handle every now and then, whereas Spirulina I can enjoy every day….and its not quite as intense as downing an oyster ;)

1. Vitamin B12 – Spirulina is a superfood that combines maximum nutritional value within the smallest calorie and consumption volume necessary. In fact just one teaspoon of spirulina provides 7 times more Vitamin 12 than mackerel and is higher than the densest Vitamin B12 containing food of clams. Vitamin B12 is used for loads of complex reactions in the body; avoiding fatigue and pernicious anaemia.

2. Full of fibre – Fibre helps us to feel fuller for longer as well as acting like a gentle brush in the intestines cleaning out debris of food that is undigested and fermenting (in a bad way). If you are finding it difficult to eat enough vegetables then you can try Spirulina for a fibre packed health kick. It provides one fourteenth of your daily requirement of fibre in an easy to consume supplement. Some people claim it helps with weight loss too.

3. Calcium – Spirulina contains more Calcium than milk. In fact it contains twice the amount that milk does. 100gm of Spirulina contains 220mg of Calcium whereas 100gm/ml of milk contains 120mg of Calcium. Sardines with bones and almonds are the only foods that contain more Calcium than Spirulina.

4. Protein – Spirulina contains more protein than most foods! Of course we wouldn’t gorge ourselves on spirulina steaks but it’s useful to know that we can get some of our daily protein requirements from it. While eggs contain 12 gm of protein per 100gm, Spirulina contains a whopping 56gm per 100gm.

5. Iron – higher than any other food in Iron Spirulina packs a punch on the Iron stakes. Another natural source of highly absorbable Iron is Spatone iron supplements. Adding both of these to your diet will ensure you have enough minerals for high energy and metabolism.

6. Zinc – important for fertility, sexual health and skin healing Zinc is the ultimate mojo-rejuvenating mineral. Spirulina contains twice as much Zinc as spinach but much less than oysters. Oysters are, after all, the ultimate love food!

7. Potassium – the most important electrolyte for athletes as well as after illness and for low carb dieters too. Potassium is an essential mineral. With nearly twice as much Potassium as a banana, the potassium in Spirulina can help to maintain electrolyte balance and prevent high blood pressure.

FYI I find its more palatable in warm (not hot) water than cold. These are the best blends I’ve found. 

Emma

Have you tried Spirulina? How did you find the taste of it?

Image courtesy of CCRES


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Keep your eye on the health *PRISE* with whey protein

If your goal is to lose weight and maintain optimal health and fitness, the quality of your exercise and diet regimen matters more than the quantity, says Skidmore College exercise scientist Paul Arciero. The clear benefits of a multi-dimensional exercise regimen that includes resistance exercise, interval sprint exercise, stretching (including yoga or pilates), endurance exercise, and moderate amounts of protein consumed regularly throughout the day have been demonstrated by Arciero.

Arciero enlisted 36 female and 21 male volunteers between the ages of 35 and 57 who could clearly be described as out of shape. They exercised less than 60 minutes per week, had done noresistance training within the last ten years, and could be described as obese or overweight, with an average body mass index of 28.6 and average body fat percentage of 36.6.

Dividing his subjects randomly into three groups, Arciero conducted a 16-week trial in which all subjects consumed the same amount of whey protein — 60 grams daily — but exercised differently. One group was sedentary, another was called on to perform intense resistance training four times per week, and the third followed a multidimensional regimen that included resistance exercise, interval sprint exercise, stretching led by a yoga instructor, and endurance exercise.

When the trial ended, Arciero found that those who had followed the multidimensional regimen showed the greatest:

  • health improvements
  • reductions in body weight
  • reductions in total and abdominal (visceral) fat mass
  • reductions in waist circumference
  • reductions in blood glucose
  • increase in percentage of lean body mass

Interestingly, all groups showed improvements, even those who maintained a sedentary lifestyle during the period and simply ate the assigned daily regimen of 60 grams of whey protein. That finding supports an earlier study by Arciero’s team that found increasing the amount of protein in one’s diet to as much as 35 percent will tend to decrease total and abdominal fat.

To make the regimen easy for the public to remember, Arciero has coined the acronym, “PRISE.”

Protein

Resistance

Interval

Stretching

Endurance.

“After all, it’s about ‘keeping your ‘eye on the PRISE’ in order to achieve optimal health,” he says.

Have you experienced improvements in your health through whey protein or changing your exercise around?

Emma

Reference:

P. J. Arciero, D. Baur, S. Connelly, M. J. Ormsbee. Timed-daily Ingestion of Whey Protein and Exercise Training Reduces Visceral Adipose Tissue Mass and Improves Insulin Resistance: The PRISE Study. Journal of Applied Physiology, 2014; DOI: 10.1152/japplphysiol.00152.2014


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Pyroluria – nutritional treatment for tension, anxiety and depression

Have you ever suffered from inner tension that you thought was just something you had to live with? Latest research has revealed a condition affecting some (stats are unknown yet) of the population and the best thing of all is that it is treatable. With simple nutrition. Amazing. There will be alot of information over the next few years regarding genetic predisposition to clinical conditions – a new branch of medicine called Nutrigenomics is merging and its very exciting. So back to the condition that causes exacerbation of tension, anxiety and depression… Pyroluria

Pyroluria

The effect of pyroluria can have a mild, moderate, or severe depending on the severity of the imbalance. Most individuals show symptoms of zinc and/or B6 deficiencies, which include poor stress control, nervousness, anxiety, mood swings, severe inner tension, episodic anger (an explosive temper), poor short-term memory and depression. Most pyrolurics exhibit at least two of these problems. These individuals cannot efficiently create serotonin (a neurotransmitter that reduces anxiety and depression) since vitamin B6 is an important factor in the last step of its synthesis. Many of these persons appear to benefit from SSRI medications such as Prozac, Paxil, Zoloft, Celexa, etc. However, as with all mind-altering drugs, side effects occur and the true cause of the mental difficulties remains uncorrected. In addition these individuals often have frequent infections and are often identified by their inability to tan, poor dream recall, abnormal fat distribution, and sensitivity to light and sound. As you can imagine an SSRI will not correct these metabolic effects. More healthful benefits may be achieved by giving the appropriate supporting nutrients.

Pyroluria is a genetically determined chemical imbalance involving an abnormality in haemoglobin synthesis. Haemoglobin is the protein that holds iron in the red blood cell. Individuals with this disorder produce too much of a byproduct of haemoglobin synthesis called “kryptopyrrole” (KP) or “hemepyrrole.” Kryptopyrrole has no known function in the body and is excreted in urine.

Kryptopyrrole binds to pyridoxine (vitamin B6) and zinc and makes them unavailable for their important roles as co-factors in enzymes and metabolism.  These essential nutrients when bound to kryptopyrrole are removed from the bloodstream and excreted into the urine as pyrrolesArachidonic acid (an omega-6 fatty acid) also becomes deficient.

Pyroluria is detected by chemical analysis of the abnormal pyroles in urine detectable as a purple (on testing paper) metabolite in called “the mauve factor.

If you would like to take the Pyroluria Questionnaire to check if you have the symptoms you can do so here and if you would like to then take the lab test go here for further information.

What do you think of this emerging field of medicine and health? Do you find it exciting or daunting? Have you been tested for Pyroluria?

Emma

Image courtesy of natural health protocol


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10 of the best foods to beat the afternoon slump

10 Best foods to beat the afternoon slump

If you’ve ever suffered the afternoon munchies (like me!) or the brain-deadness that many of us feel around 3pm in the afternoon try these foods to see if you have some improvement in your symptoms. Factor them in as your afternoon snack but don’t have them in addition to a biscuit :)

1. Chia seeds – high in Omega 3 oils as well as being a concentrated source of minerals Chia seeds can be made into balls with coconut oil and cocoa for a sweet tooth hit or soaked in water as a drink.

2. Cinnamon – high in Chromium cinnamon is the best spice for balancing blood sugar. Add it to a good quality coffee, tea or yoghurt. 70mcg of Chromium which can reduce blood glucose levels by up to 30%.  Continue reading


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Nutritional Lab Tests [available now!]

Finally I’m so excited to let you know that I’m offering lab tests as a service without your needing to have a full consultation. You can also have a consultation if you like and it would be my pleasure to help you out with your health enquiry :)

Did you know that a Lab test can reveal where your health is really at? If you’ve ever thought you may have low Iron levels, an under-active thyroid or your hormones are out of whack a lab tests can show you alot more info than you probably thought. Lab tests with Emma Nutrition

Your GP practice is not the only place to order functional lab testing. In fact, a functional practitioner can offer analysis of results in quite a different way. For example if your thryoid test comes back as ‘normal’ do you know what this means? It means that your thyroid is functioning in a way that fits into the middle range of the population. That population is made up of well people, sick people, old people, young people etc. A sample of these people are tested and the middle range is then set as the ‘normal’ range. Obviously this works statistically but its not specific and certainly not tailored to individuals. What is going on in YOUR body is what you want to know! Well that’s what I want to know when I have a test done. As much as I care for my elderly neighbour I’m not interested in how MY results compare to HERS or how YOURS to OTHERS but more what YOUR results mean to you and your health. If you want to know what’s really going in your body a lab test is a solid objective way to measure but make sure you get it analysed by someone who has functional diagnostics knowledge. For those who are interested I did my training with Dicken Wetherby and I keep up to date with his courses and books as well as with Invivo Clinical, Genova Diagnostics and Diagnostechs as well as independent laboratories.

Previously you’ve only been offered tests within consultations but now you can order tests directly without a full consultation.

Tests available:

Adrenal Stress Profile Test

Hair Mineral Analysis Test

Click the links to see sample results, prices and get more information.

Emma

Don’t forget to sign up for the hottest health news if you’re not already on the list!

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Become a Nutrition Expert and Help People Fulfil Their potential

Become a Nutrition Expert and Help People Fulfil Their potential

Do you feel the urge to help people live healthier lives? Are you the go-to person for Nutrition advice? Or do you feel you could offer a more rounded service as a personal trainer, health coach, acupuncturist, herbalist, yoga teacher etc?

If you find yourself researching the latest dietary trends and physiology of metabolism you may wish to consider  formalising your education and finding a community of like-minded individuals. While you can ‘make it’ through self-education, you can really ‘make it’ by offering something extra to your clients. Girl doing Weights

See, some personal trainers are blessed. You might even be one of them. You might have a natural confidence, the ability to build rapport with almost anyone and a knack for selling in your services.

But give your clients something extra and they will do most of the legwork on promotion for you.

Nutrition. It’s an irresistible ‘something extra’ – especially this time of year. Add in-depth dietary knowledge to your personal training or coaching repertoire and you could generate stacks of business from your dedicated clients who see you as their go-to advisor.

Set yourself apart

When you’re starting out as a gym instructor, you’re faced with some heavy business challenges – one being that many gym-goers like to think they know everything they need to, and therefore do not require your help.

This is less of a problem when it comes to nutrition … but that side of the profession comes with its own set of obstacles.

People (particularly the health-conscious) need genuine, proven and trustworthy advice when it comes to what they consume. If you’re half-heartedly advising clients on what to eat post-workout, or if you struggle to answer their diet-related questions, it can show weakness in your skills elsewhere.

If a client loses faith in you because of some poor nutritional guidance, then they could lose faith in you altogether.

On the flipside, if you confidently deliver the correct nutritional direction for your clients (even if they’re not paying you for it yet), then you’re offering that crucial ‘something extra’. You’re more than just another gym instructor – you’re a health and fitness authority.

To get hold of the knowledge you need and set yourself apart from the next trainer that comes along, take a course – get an actual nutrition qualification for your hard work.

It takes six weeks on average to complete the Level 3 Weight and Management course from Health and Fitness Education.

Anybody can apply. I’m not suggesting this course will give you everything you need to know but starting with a formal qualification will give you a solid foundation, credibility and the tools to know where to find further information and when to refer to a more qualified specialist who will refer back to you too. If you can set up good relationships with other health professionals in your area (even Nutritionists) you can all work together to help not only each other but your clients. Lets face it; we are all here because we are passionate about making a difference in people’s lives.

6 week nutrition course

The material provided on this course is second to none – I’ve reviewed it, along with their Pilates course.

You receive a nutrition booklet that’s loaded with scientific theory, evidence and examples for you to work off. Every single word has been placed in there by fitness experts who’ve done all this before.

The content debunks several myths around dieting, eating disorders and disease prevention.

So, you’re only ever delivering factually sound advice to your clients when it comes to nutrition. Simply guessing at a subject as serious as health can be dangerous to your client’s wellbeing … and to that of your career.

The world’s attitude to health and fitness changes a lot. A new discovery is made by a scientist, picked up by several tabloids and goes viral within hours. It happens all the time.

How do you keep up with that? You lock the fundamentals of health and fitness down first (and that’s exactly what you’ll get from HFE’s up-to-date nutrition course), then adapt the learning’s to any real industry shifts.

You can separate the ‘real’ from the hyped-up theories because after the course, you’ll have the fundamentals locked down and you already know how to spot a myth in the fitness sector.

It’s up to you …

Beyond your qualification, it’s up to you to stay on top of the latest nutritional breakthroughs. And it’s always recommended that you refresh your knowledge through your own research.

For example, HFE recently broke down the healthy body fat percentages for males and females, of five different age groups, just last month via its blog. This is the type of bitesize information you can relay to clients when they ask things during a session.

Emma

What’s your most commonly asked question on nutrition? Share it in the comments below and let’s see if we can identify a trend.

This was a sponsored post from HFE. I have reviewed their courses and online structure and give my endorsement of the content of their courses.

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