Emma Nutrition

Simplifying the science through cooking and education. When I'm not on Mummy duties…


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10 of the best foods to beat the afternoon slump

10 Best foods to beat the afternoon slump

If you’ve ever suffered the afternoon munchies (like me!) or the brain-deadness that many of us feel around 3pm in the afternoon try these foods to see if you have some improvement in your symptoms. Factor them in as your afternoon snack but don’t have them in addition to a biscuit :)

1. Chia seeds – high in Omega 3 oils as well as being a concentrated source of minerals Chia seeds can be made into balls with coconut oil and cocoa for a sweet tooth hit or soaked in water as a drink.

2. Cinnamon – high in Chromium cinnamon is the best spice for balancing blood sugar. Add it to a good quality coffee, tea or yoghurt. 70mcg of Chromium which can reduce blood glucose levels by up to 30%.  Continue reading


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Nutritional Lab Tests [available now!]

Finally I’m so excited to let you know that I’m offering lab tests as a service without your needing to have a full consultation. You can also have a consultation if you like and it would be my pleasure to help you out with your health enquiry :)

Did you know that a Lab test can reveal where your health is really at? If you’ve ever thought you may have low Iron levels, an under-active thyroid or your hormones are out of whack a lab tests can show you alot more info than you probably thought. Lab tests with Emma Nutrition

Your GP practice is not the only place to order functional lab testing. In fact, a functional practitioner can offer analysis of results in quite a different way. For example if your thryoid test comes back as ‘normal’ do you know what this means? It means that your thyroid is functioning in a way that fits into the middle range of the population. That population is made up of well people, sick people, old people, young people etc. A sample of these people are tested and the middle range is then set as the ‘normal’ range. Obviously this works statistically but its not specific and certainly not tailored to individuals. What is going on in YOUR body is what you want to know! Well that’s what I want to know when I have a test done. As much as I care for my elderly neighbour I’m not interested in how MY results compare to HERS or how YOURS to OTHERS but more what YOUR results mean to you and your health. If you want to know what’s really going in your body a lab test is a solid objective way to measure but make sure you get it analysed by someone who has functional diagnostics knowledge. For those who are interested I did my training with Dicken Wetherby and I keep up to date with his courses and books as well as with Invivo Clinical, Genova Diagnostics and Diagnostechs as well as independent laboratories.

Previously you’ve only been offered tests within consultations but now you can order tests directly without a full consultation.

Tests available:

Adrenal Stress Profile Test

Hair Mineral Analysis Test

Click the links to see sample results, prices and get more information.

Emma

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Become a Nutrition Expert and Help People Fulfil Their potential

Become a Nutrition Expert and Help People Fulfil Their potential

Do you feel the urge to help people live healthier lives? Are you the go-to person for Nutrition advice? Or do you feel you could offer a more rounded service as a personal trainer, health coach, acupuncturist, herbalist, yoga teacher etc?

If you find yourself researching the latest dietary trends and physiology of metabolism you may wish to consider  formalising your education and finding a community of like-minded individuals. While you can ‘make it’ through self-education, you can really ‘make it’ by offering something extra to your clients. Girl doing Weights

See, some personal trainers are blessed. You might even be one of them. You might have a natural confidence, the ability to build rapport with almost anyone and a knack for selling in your services.

But give your clients something extra and they will do most of the legwork on promotion for you.

Nutrition. It’s an irresistible ‘something extra’ – especially this time of year. Add in-depth dietary knowledge to your personal training or coaching repertoire and you could generate stacks of business from your dedicated clients who see you as their go-to advisor.

Set yourself apart

When you’re starting out as a gym instructor, you’re faced with some heavy business challenges – one being that many gym-goers like to think they know everything they need to, and therefore do not require your help.

This is less of a problem when it comes to nutrition … but that side of the profession comes with its own set of obstacles.

People (particularly the health-conscious) need genuine, proven and trustworthy advice when it comes to what they consume. If you’re half-heartedly advising clients on what to eat post-workout, or if you struggle to answer their diet-related questions, it can show weakness in your skills elsewhere.

If a client loses faith in you because of some poor nutritional guidance, then they could lose faith in you altogether.

On the flipside, if you confidently deliver the correct nutritional direction for your clients (even if they’re not paying you for it yet), then you’re offering that crucial ‘something extra’. You’re more than just another gym instructor – you’re a health and fitness authority.

To get hold of the knowledge you need and set yourself apart from the next trainer that comes along, take a course – get an actual nutrition qualification for your hard work.

It takes six weeks on average to complete the Level 3 Weight and Management course from Health and Fitness Education.

Anybody can apply. I’m not suggesting this course will give you everything you need to know but starting with a formal qualification will give you a solid foundation, credibility and the tools to know where to find further information and when to refer to a more qualified specialist who will refer back to you too. If you can set up good relationships with other health professionals in your area (even Nutritionists) you can all work together to help not only each other but your clients. Lets face it; we are all here because we are passionate about making a difference in people’s lives.

6 week nutrition course

The material provided on this course is second to none – I’ve reviewed it, along with their Pilates course.

You receive a nutrition booklet that’s loaded with scientific theory, evidence and examples for you to work off. Every single word has been placed in there by fitness experts who’ve done all this before.

The content debunks several myths around dieting, eating disorders and disease prevention.

So, you’re only ever delivering factually sound advice to your clients when it comes to nutrition. Simply guessing at a subject as serious as health can be dangerous to your client’s wellbeing … and to that of your career.

The world’s attitude to health and fitness changes a lot. A new discovery is made by a scientist, picked up by several tabloids and goes viral within hours. It happens all the time.

How do you keep up with that? You lock the fundamentals of health and fitness down first (and that’s exactly what you’ll get from HFE’s up-to-date nutrition course), then adapt the learning’s to any real industry shifts.

You can separate the ‘real’ from the hyped-up theories because after the course, you’ll have the fundamentals locked down and you already know how to spot a myth in the fitness sector.

It’s up to you …

Beyond your qualification, it’s up to you to stay on top of the latest nutritional breakthroughs. And it’s always recommended that you refresh your knowledge through your own research.

For example, HFE recently broke down the healthy body fat percentages for males and females, of five different age groups, just last month via its blog. This is the type of bitesize information you can relay to clients when they ask things during a session.

Emma

What’s your most commonly asked question on nutrition? Share it in the comments below and let’s see if we can identify a trend.

This was a sponsored post from HFE. I have reviewed their courses and online structure and give my endorsement of the content of their courses.


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The best kids holidays

Deciding on where to take the kids for the holidays can be a full time job! I have the propensity to spend FAR too much time researching destinations and venues and if I’m honest, using holiday research as a procrastination tool. It works very well in case you needed something to distract you from an important task.

Last summer we had just 2 weeks and on a whim (usually my spontaneous streak wins against the control freak streak even after much research!) we went camping in France. We had to upgrade the camping equipment from the last time we went pre-kids. That trip is now known as ‘the camping trip from hell’ and I did, in a very un-environmentally-friendly way, throw our campers guidebook out the window of the car when we finally decided that Southern French campsites in August are just not the place to be darling (trust me on this; do not go there in August!) and we booked a hotel. Understandably I was quite nervous in case we had a repeat experience of camping on a roundabout, showering with a deodorant stick and getting kicked out of unapproved sites by the police. Now we are parents we must alter our behaviour and be responsible…

Fortunately we discovered camping in the French Alps. Absolute bliss. There was space, clean showers, a washing machine and I even had my hair-dryer in the tent! Civilised camping! The husband and kids would get up early, grab some croissants from the bakery and make coffee while I leisurely made my way out of my bedroom. Yes we had a bedroom. 4 of them in fact AND a lounge room. This tent was considerably bigger than the ‘camping trip from hell’ tent.

Watching Daddy putting up the tent!

Watching Daddy putting up the tent!

Continue reading


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Why you should ditch your beauty products!

As a firm believer in keeping things as simple as possible I am in the process of ditching the whole bathroom cupboard full of ‘stuff’. By stuff I mean chemicals… I’ve long toyed with natural products and gone natural whenever I can. The difference in my skin when I go natural, and when I increase my nutrient levels, is extraordinary – I was pretty pleased when my beautician told me I had beautiful skin and I don’t THINK she said it to butter me up….incidentally if you want to give your skin a huge plumpness boost try upping your dose of Vitamin C. Personally I need 4-8gm per day during the winter. Anyhow…DIY Baby Wipes

Recently Moo Goo skin care sent me some samples to try and they were AMAZING. I may have good skin but my scalp is a mess; too many years of dying my blonde hair dark obviously…erm my mousey brown hair to blonde I mean. One wash with their shampoo and conditioner and my scalp was markedly less irritated. Once I added in their scalp cream my scalp felt like it could breathe again. I have now thrown out all of my other shampoo’s and am even aiming to learn to make my own dry shampoo (the godsend product for all busy mum’s!).

Anyhow, there is a stack of information around about chemicals in skin care but where do you start? A few years ago I worked on developing a skin care product range based on Manuka Honey and the project seemed to be never-ending! It was a minefield of unwanted and unused chemicals with contraindications but the chemicals are popular for two reasons: Continue reading


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Expert Interviews – Digestive Wellness Series

Did you know that IBS is one of the most common digestive problems experienced by 10-15% of the population at some point in their lives. IBS sufferers are thought to account for: woman holding belly

  • 3.5 million Physician visits each year
  • $8 US billion in medical costs[1].
  • 40% of all referrals to hospital Gastroenterologists in the UK[2]

….and yet

90% of patients are still symptomatic 5 years later!

These stats and my own personal and professional experience with Digestive Wellness have prompted me to get in touch with some of the top experts on Digestive health and run some interviews. I’m so excited to be doing this and hope that as many people as possible will listen to the series, learn cutting edge info and get the help they deserve.

To get on the earlybird list for the series register here!

To hear my Intro (and first foray into podcast-ing!) listen here by clicking on the play button:



[1] (Viera AJ, 2002)

[2] (Murga M, 1998)

 

Image courtesy of: James Island Chiropractic

 


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Almond Butter Cups

An American classic, these almond butter cups are awesome for a little treat or as a home-made present. This recipe is based on one from Carefree Candies but uses almond butter and a few tweaks.

Print or Save PDF Almond Butter Cups

Ingredients: Almond butter cups

Chocolate Coating 
Cocoa x 6tbsp
Coconut oil x 3tbsp
Stevia extract (to taste) 1/8 – 1/4 tsp
Maple syrup (to taste) 1tsp
Sea Salt, fine x 1/4 tsp
Vanilla extract x 1 tsp Continue reading


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What is a whole grain?

Have you ever wondered what a whole grain actually is? We hear the term and think ‘oh that’s something made with whole grains in it or with brown flour’ but what exactly does the term ‘whole grain’ really mean?Wheat

What many of us may not realize is that there is no complete, legally endorsed definition of what comprises whole grain. Which means, for instance, that 35% whole grain on one food label could mean something quite different than 35% whole grain on another. There is now an updated definition – termed HEALTHGRAIN — that is a step toward creating a common understanding of what “whole grain” implies. Current definitions are often incomplete, lacking descriptions of the included grains and the permitted flour manufacturing processes.

“Most cereal products, like white bread, pasta, and biscuits, are based on flour after removal of bran and germ, the two parts of grain kernels containing most of the dietary fibre and other bioactive components. In the past decade, consumers have been rediscovering whole grain-based products and the number of wholegrain products has increased rapidly.” – you can find an abstract of the study here or my copy of the actual report is here. Continue reading


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Recipe: DIY Coconut Yoghurt

What is it about coconut that tastes so amazing? I could eat it all day long; whether its in a soup, an oil, a yoghurt or a pina colada! As far as recipe experiments go this one was alot of fun to eat afterward. Next on the list is almond yoghurt – it’s currently in the Easiyo but I am having difficulty making it thick enough. Any tips welcome!

Ingredients:

Coconut milk or Coconut cream tins x 3

Greek yoghurt x 3 tbsp

Vanilla essence x 1 tsp

Coconut sugar (optional sweetness) x 1 tbsp  Continue reading


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The Bliss Point – thoughts on Sugar

Have you seen any of the recent TV shows on sugar? It’s about time this information finally surfaced! The sugar industry is big bucks and while most of us are probably aware that it contains empty calories, did you know that our body reacts to it like its a drug? Ever noticed how sometimes you just cant stop eating it?

I watch my kids when we go somewhere that serves them sugar – jelly or fruit juice etc and they firstly resemble drug-addicts; unable to get enough of the ‘good stuff’. They then become hyperactive and irrational for 20 mins. This is followed by, for me, the scariest part of the sugar-drug-rush and its the sugar-stupor. They cant think, they are grumpy and generally need a sleep at inopportune times. The sugar-stupor isn’t limited to our kids and some believe its not an acute symptom but a long-term real social and physical problem.

Are you too Stupid?

Choose sugar or you are stupid..?

Back to The Bliss Point…the perfect marriage of fat, salt and sugar. The point at which the texture or mouth-feel is soft and buttery, the flavour is intense without being overpowering and the feelgood factor exists. The bliss point is individual and is an acquired taste however it is also cultural and generic to a point. The more sugar you eat, the more you will want to eat as the less other food tastes good. Recently I tried removing salt from my diet and now the tiniest bit of salt is too tasty for me. It works the same way for sugar.

Robert Lustig believes that sugar is the cause of diabetes. His talk on sugar https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dBnniua6-oM is well worth watching; I have watched it 3 times and get something new every time. High fructose (fruit sugar) corn syrup is used in soft drinks, soups, processed foods and has been studied as a contributor to heart disease markers eg trigylcerides, cholesterol etc. When testing for the markers of heart disease one common theme, or associated risk, is an increases in visceral adiposity – the fat surrounding the liver, kidneys, bowel. When healthy students were given a high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) drink for 2 weeks all of their cardiovascular disease risk factors increased.

At the 1999 get together of top food industry executives they received a presentation on ‘Responding to the challenge of childhood obesity’. This presentation told these execs that the environment that encourages obesity is the “Ubiquity of inexpensive, good-tasting, super-sized, energy-dense foods.” They scoffed at this theory. In 1972, when British scientist John Yudkin first proved that sugar was bad for our health, he was ignored by the majority of the medical profession and rubbished by the food industry. The scientist Ansel Keys was a major player in debunking Yudkin. Ansel Keys later debunked his own research on fats.

Will the food industry be next?

Leaked tobacco industry documents

Leaked tobacco industry documents

Stan Lance, who published secret tobacco documents says that “strategies that the tobacco companies used were being used much earlier by the sugar industry”. The parallel he see is that the sugar industry tries to undermine science and to intimidate scientists as well as subverting sensible regulation. In 2003 WHO was looking at a resolution for sugar to be reduced to just 10% of what people were currently eating. The resolution never went forward. The sugar industry influenced US congress to pull this recommendation by threatening to pull its funding of WHO. Just like we wouldn’t have a tobacco epidemic if there wasn’t a tobacco industry, we wouldn’t have an obesity epidemic if we didn’t have an industry selling sugar, salt and fat – or the perfect combination of these ingredients; The Bliss Point.

To control the epidemic of non-communicable disease we have to control the food giants. But how? The law to ban supersize soft drinks in the States was overturned. Then followed advertising suggesting we were infringing on consumer freedom and rights by limiting consumption or telling people what they could eat. If fat and Sodium have limits why does sugar not? The consumer is blamed for their over-consumption yet they are not given the information they need or given it in unclear formats. Who knows how much sugar is in a child’s yoghurt or how much is too much?

What are your thoughts on sugar and the sugar industry?

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